November 14, 2006

Global water crisis

Human access to water and sanitation is improving all over the world according to the United Nations.



Contrary to its own findings, however, the UN describes the situation as a deepening global water crisis. The water problems are not global, are not deepening and, since they have been chronic for all of human history, are not a crisis - but UN bureaucrats want a crisis, so they invent it.

UN bureaucrat and ideologue Kemal Derviş writes in the foreword to the report:
Access to water for life is a basic human need and a fundamental human right. Yet in our increasingly prosperous world, more than 1 billion people are denied the right to clean water and 2.6 billion people lack access to adequate sanitation.
Denied? By whom?
Meanwhile, the ill health associated with deficits in water and sanitation undermines productivity and economic growth, reinforcing the deep inequalities that characterize current patterns of globalization and trapping vulnerable households in cycles of poverty.
Derviş chooses to mention "current patterns of globalization," but could instead have written "the deep inequalities that characterize current policies that restrict the voluntary exchange of goods and services, the movement of people, and other individual freedoms."

The reference to water as a human right is no joke. The authors of the report do mean it:
Make water a human right—and mean it. All governments should go beyond vague constitutional principles to enshrine the human right to water in enabling legislation. To have real meaning, the human right has to correspond to an entitlement to a secure, accessible and affordable supply of water. The appropriate entitlement will vary by country and household circumstance. But at a minimum it implies a target of at least 20 litres of clean water a day for every citizen—and at no cost for those too poor to pay. Clear benchmarks should be set for progressing towards the target, with national and local governments and water providers held accountable for progress. While private providers have a role to play in water delivery, extending the human right to water is an obligation of governments.
This is how the UN wants to solve the water problems - by banning clean water scarcity by law and force.

1 comment:

  1. When water was de-publicized/government provided and markets opened, you'll recall, Bechtel jacked up the price of drinking water, the thirsty market revolted, and Bechtel had to scurry away.

    Surely, you being an ecologist and all, have an idea about the fact that drinking water is only one offstream use and ag needs much more water than humans do for sanitary drinking water.

    So, to address your little tactic of thinking you have asked a clever question (denied by whom), the denial comes from institutionalized or structuralized denial due to corruption and/or inadequate infrastructure funding to deliver groundwater to small ag in developing countries. Hence the not naming a 'whom' because it is not a simple thing to name a 'whom'.

    Lastly, credit where credit is due: I must admit your

    Derviş chooses to mention "current patterns of globalization," but could instead have written "the deep inequalities that characterize current policies that restrict the voluntary exchange of goods and services, the movement of people, and other individual freedoms."

    is right on.

    Globalization indeed exacerbates the deep inequalities that characterize current policies that restrict the voluntary exchange of goods and services, the movement of people, and other individual freedoms.

    Best,

    D

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